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In Love with Sherlock . Dolphins . Doctor Who . David Tennant . Tom Hiddleston . Monty Python . Community . Johnny Depp . Tim Burton . Disney Princesses . Mermaids . Nerds . Zoey Deschannel . Coldplay . Street Art . Photography . Nature . Science, and other stuff :P

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Reblogged from impermanent-art

(Source: impermanent-art, via pmon3y69)

Reblogged from drdawg

yes-i-am-lucifer:

pmon3y69:

drdawg:

my friend Pete literally makes me cry with his snap stories

this is me, i am pete, love me 

we love you pete

(via fatedcircle)

Reblogged from jaguarslair

(Source: jaguarslair, via fatedcircle)

Reblogged from fastcompany
pulsecrow:

countsassmaster:

geardrops:

fastcompany:

Portable Robot Printer Is Like A Roomba That Squirts Ink

it’s so cute i want an army of them

take it to school and print gay porn in your teacher’s planner book.

That is not the intended use sir

pulsecrow:

countsassmaster:

geardrops:

fastcompany:

Portable Robot Printer Is Like A Roomba That Squirts Ink

it’s so cute i want an army of them

take it to school and print gay porn in your teacher’s planner book.

That is not the intended use sir

(via dietcokeandmusicals)

Reblogged from kenobi-wan-obi
kenobi-wan-obi:

Keyhole in The Clouds

This photo was taken as the rain clouds began to build. Just as the sun was to set, it shone perfectly through the cloud, creating the “keyhole to heaven”. The Angel reflection around the outside of the cloud/light formation made this photo very unique.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Keyhole in The Clouds

This photo was taken as the rain clouds began to build. Just as the sun was to set, it shone perfectly through the cloud, creating the “keyhole to heaven”. The Angel reflection around the outside of the cloud/light formation made this photo very unique.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

Reblogged from kenobi-wan-obi
kenobi-wan-obi:

Bad-Ass Female Scientists: Lynn Margulis


  "
I don’t consider my ideas controversial. I consider them right."
  
  Biologist Lynn Margulis died on November 22nd. She stood out from her colleagues in that she would have extended evolutionary studies nearly four billion years back in time. Her major work was  in cell evolution, in which the great event was the appearance of the eukaryotic, or nucleated, cell — the cell upon which all larger life-forms are based. Nearly forty-five years ago, she argued for its symbiotic origin: that it arose by associations of different kinds of bacteria. Her ideas were generally either ignored or ridiculed when she first proposed them; symbiosis in cell evolution is now considered one of the great scientific breakthroughs.
  
  Margulis was also a champion of the Gaia hypothesis, an idea developed in the 1970s by the free lance British atmospheric chemist James E. Lovelock. The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere and surface sediments of the planet Earth form a self- regulating physiological system — Earth’s surface is alive. The strong version of the hypothesis, which has been widely criticized by the biological establishment, holds that the earth itself is a self-regulating organism; Margulis subscribed to a weaker version, seeing the planet as an integrated self- regulating ecosystem. She was criticized for succumbing to what George Williams called the “God-is good” syndrome, as evidenced by her adoption of metaphors of symbiosis in nature. She was, in turn, an outspoken critic of mainstream evolutionary biologists for what she saw as a failure to adequately consider the importance of chemistry and microbiology in evolution.
  
  I first met her in the late 80’s and in 1994 interviewed her for my book The Third Culture: Beyond the Scientific Revolution (1995). Below, in remembrance, please see her chapter, “Gaia is a Tough Bitch”. One of the compelling features of The Third Culture was that I invited each of the participants to comment about the others. In this regard, the end of the following chapter has comments on Margulis and her work by Daniel C. Dennett, the late George C. Williams, W. Daniel Hillis, Lee Smolin, Marvin Minsky, Richard Dawkins, and the late Francisco Varela. Interesting stuff.
  
  As I wrote in the introduction to the first part of the book (Part I: The Evolutionary Idea): “The principal debates are concerned with the mechanism of speciation; whether natural selection operates at the level of the gene, the organism, or the species, or all three; and also with the relative importance of other factors, such as natural catastrophes.” These very public debates were concerned with ideas represented by George C. Williams and Richard Dawkins on one side and Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge on the other side. Not for Lynn Margulis. All the above scientists were wrong because evolutionary studies needed to begin four billion years back in time. And she was not shy about expressing her opinions. Her in-your-face, take-no-prisoners stance was pugnacious and tenacious. She was impossible. She was wonderful. — John Brockman
  
  "Gaia is a tough bitch." L. Margulis

kenobi-wan-obi:

Bad-Ass Female Scientists: Lynn Margulis

"
I don’t consider my ideas controversial. I consider them right."

Biologist Lynn Margulis died on November 22nd. She stood out from her colleagues in that she would have extended evolutionary studies nearly four billion years back in time. Her major work was in cell evolution, in which the great event was the appearance of the eukaryotic, or nucleated, cell — the cell upon which all larger life-forms are based. Nearly forty-five years ago, she argued for its symbiotic origin: that it arose by associations of different kinds of bacteria. Her ideas were generally either ignored or ridiculed when she first proposed them; symbiosis in cell evolution is now considered one of the great scientific breakthroughs.

Margulis was also a champion of the Gaia hypothesis, an idea developed in the 1970s by the free lance British atmospheric chemist James E. Lovelock. The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere and surface sediments of the planet Earth form a self- regulating physiological system — Earth’s surface is alive. The strong version of the hypothesis, which has been widely criticized by the biological establishment, holds that the earth itself is a self-regulating organism; Margulis subscribed to a weaker version, seeing the planet as an integrated self- regulating ecosystem. She was criticized for succumbing to what George Williams called the “God-is good” syndrome, as evidenced by her adoption of metaphors of symbiosis in nature. She was, in turn, an outspoken critic of mainstream evolutionary biologists for what she saw as a failure to adequately consider the importance of chemistry and microbiology in evolution.

I first met her in the late 80’s and in 1994 interviewed her for my book The Third Culture: Beyond the Scientific Revolution (1995). Below, in remembrance, please see her chapter, “Gaia is a Tough Bitch”. One of the compelling features of The Third Culture was that I invited each of the participants to comment about the others. In this regard, the end of the following chapter has comments on Margulis and her work by Daniel C. Dennett, the late George C. Williams, W. Daniel Hillis, Lee Smolin, Marvin Minsky, Richard Dawkins, and the late Francisco Varela. Interesting stuff.

As I wrote in the introduction to the first part of the book (Part I: The Evolutionary Idea): “The principal debates are concerned with the mechanism of speciation; whether natural selection operates at the level of the gene, the organism, or the species, or all three; and also with the relative importance of other factors, such as natural catastrophes.” These very public debates were concerned with ideas represented by George C. Williams and Richard Dawkins on one side and Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge on the other side. Not for Lynn Margulis. All the above scientists were wrong because evolutionary studies needed to begin four billion years back in time. And she was not shy about expressing her opinions. Her in-your-face, take-no-prisoners stance was pugnacious and tenacious. She was impossible. She was wonderful. — John Brockman

"Gaia is a tough bitch." L. Margulis

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

Reblogged from chris-evans-heaven

hello-i-m-the-doctor:

destiel-making-love:

Don’t be fooled by the adorable puppies…

imageimageimage

They’re actually really bad ass menimageimageimage

….

image

… most of the time 

Reblogging for Jensen in the last gif

(Source: chris-evans-heaven, via stupidimaginarygirl)

Reblogged from pixel-colors
Reblogged from betenoiresmash

betenoiresmash:

How to suddenly become Sub-Zero of Mortal Kombat…

(via aslutinlatin)

Reblogged from osapony

(Source: osapony, via aslutinlatin)

Reblogged from feellng
Hate the sin, love the sinner. Mahatma Gandhi (via feellng)

(via aslutinlatin)

Reblogged from dudeufugly

lotrlockedwhovian:

tom-sits-like-a-whore:

mrs-freebatchof221bbakerstreet:

dudeufugly:

video via londonphile

now also on youtube

OMG IT’S LIKE IT PHYSICALLY HURTS HIM TO NOT BE HUMBLE AND MODEST AND AN ALL OUT GENTLEMAN  LIKE “SHIT I JUST CALLED MYSELF HANDSOME OMG TOM HIDDLESTON IS GONNA BE PISSED”

meanwhile, somewhere in England

image

still the best post.

(via fevildevil)

Reblogged from outraged

outraged:

I wish I wasn’t so annoying like I even piss myself off

(Source: outraged, via queen-oftokyo)

Reblogged from the-time-lord-of-the-rings

there-are-some-who-call-me-tim:

caerulea-divilu:

did-someone-say-pool:

the-time-lord-of-the-rings:

Mama Fury on waking up the Avengers.

(Source: Imgur)

LOKI IS FUCKGN DUCT TAPED TO THE BED I SIMPLY CANNOT

I don’t think there will ever come a time when I won’t reblog this.

I would like to make one thing very clear: Fury’s wearing a dressing gown and bunny slippers.

(via fatedcircle)